The Great Big Green Week

The Great Big Green Week is a weeklong, nationwide event created to help promote green living. There has been a rise in extreme weather over the years and it’s having a serious negative impact on the UK and its wildlife.

That’s why we’re urging as many people as possible to take part in The Great Big Green Week and do their bit for the planet.

What is The Great Big Green Week?

The Great Big Green Week takes place 18 – 26 September 2021. It’s a national event that will have over 4500 events that celebrate nature and green living.

The Great Big Green Week will see thousands of communities take part in the event all over the country that celebrates action against climate change. There will be events that cover how to tackle climate change, how you can help protect your area and teach you ways to help nature return.

The Great Big Green Week has a huge focus on community and all the events will be community lead affairs. These might be art installations, concerts, local markets and more. Plenty of local establishments and facilities like places of worship, sports clubs and schools are taking part and we want to be able to show how action against climate change can help impact and improve your local community.

There are major wildlife charities and national organisations, institutions, businesses, and media outlets getting involved too. This will be the biggest event for climate and nature ever seen in the UK.

The Great Big Green Week

How Do I Join In With The Great Big Green Week?

Joining in with The Great Big Green Week is easy. There are lots and lots of events happening up and down the country and we are sure that you will find one near you. You can search for The Great Big Green Week events in your area, here.

You can even host your event. If you want to be more proactive and take a stance on your community’s action against climate change then you can help lead your own event in The Great Big Green Week.

You won’t have to do it completely alone. If you contact The Great Big Green Week organisers through their website, they can help provide you will all the resources they need and help you find other organisers in your area.

What Can I Do For The Great Big Green Week?

There is so much you can do to take part in The Great Big Green Week and to help take action against climate change. You can come along to any of The Great Big Green Week events and bring your family and friends so that the cause to help the planet has as much support as possible.

If you can’t get to one of The Great Big Green Week events in person, then there is still plenty that you can do to help at home. Sign the declaration to send a message to the prime minister asking him to act on climate change. You can tweet or write to your MP, it is their job to represent your local area and you can request that they take action against climate change into consideration. You can find other ways you can participate here.

The most important thing you can do is do your bit for the planter and do as much as you can for local wildlife.  You can make your garden a safe haven for a small creatures that have been affected by climate change and need a little bit of help when it comes to finding food and shelter.

Many UK birds have lost their homes and hunting grounds as more and more home is being built in the countryside. Sometimes trees have been cut down and vital boglands drained so that these houses can get built, leaving the birds without sources of food, water and shelter.

You can help provide birds with everything they need. By feeding the birds you are helping them get all the nutrients and proteins they need to survive in these unknown circumstances as climate change creates huge anomalies and uncertainties in their normal routines.

Charities like The RSPB are heavily involved with The Great Big Green Week and you can find any information you need about helping local birds on their website.

rspb logo

Bird watching a great, fun and easy hobby that any can pick and up can be enjoyed from the comfort of your own garden.

Learning about all the different birds the visit your garden can be fun but there are few things you need to know if you want to get the most out of your garden bird watching. Here is our guide to bird watching at home.

Make Sure The Birds Have Access To Water

Birds need water to drink and clean themselves, especially in summer. When birds are flying, they will be looking for a safe place to land and they are more likely to land if they have access to water.

Try leaving some water out for the birds. Ideally it needs to be a large bowl or bird bath so that the birds can easily land and have access to the water. If you have a pond or a water feature you may find birds are already drawn to your garden.

You Can Use Food To Attract Birds

One of the most important things to know about birds is that they are always looking for food. Birds need food that is high protein and good fats. Birds need a lot of calories and food for them to have enough energy to survive.

Leaving food out for birds can be a huge help for them, especially in winter when food is scare and birds are burning more and more energy in an effort to keep warm.

Be very careful about what you choose to feed the birds. Birds have very delicate digestive systems and not everything is suitable for them. Some of the foods suitable for garden birds include:

Mixed Birdseed

We sell a range of mixed birds seeds with every mix specially designed to either suit a particular bird or help with a particular part of the bird’s diet.

Mealworms For Birds

We sell both dried and live mealworms for birds. We also sell a specially designed mealworm bird feeder.

Peanuts For Birds

The peanuts we sell for birds are different from the ones you find in supermarkets. It’s important you only feed birds food that has been tested so that is it not harmful to them. We have a variety of peanuts for birds including peanuts both with and without shells.

Plain Wild Bird Seeds

We get a variety of different seeds from a range of different plants and food mixes including maize, oats and raisins.

Suet For Birds

Suet is a great alternative to dry foods. Here at Kennedy Wild Bird Feed we a have a variety of different suet products like suet pellets, fat balls and filled coconut shells.

Sunflower Seeds For Birds

Sunflower seeds are possibly the best thing you possibly feed to your garden birds. They are full of all the nutrients and good fats birds need to stay healthy. We have sunflower hearts, sunflower heart chips and black sunflower seeds.

Make Your Garden Bird Friendly

Birds won’t visit you garden if you don’t feel safe. For birds, survival is their priority, and they won’t land somewhere if they don’t think they’ll be safe.

You can make you garden safe for visiting bird by doing just a few small things. If you are leaving water out for birds make sure it, it’s on an elevated platform like a bird bath. If you leave the water on the ground for the birds, them they may be vulnerable to ground predators, like cats.

You can protect your garden birds from birds of prey by using a bird feeder. Placing the bird feeder by a wall or a tree means that birds of prey can’t swoop down and take a garden bird with ease.

Remember To Respect The Birds

Its very important that we respect nature and don’t try and change the order of things too much. It’s ok to feed the birds every now and then but be wary of over feeding them and don’t refill the bird feeder if you don’t too.

Even if you put all the necessary precautions to try and keep your garden birds safe, predators will still try and attack. sometimes you will lose birds to ground predators and birds of prey and sadly there is nothing we can do about this. Birds are part of a delicate eco system and although we can try and help we cant interfere.

The UK has many birds that are becoming endangered and facing extinction. Luckily there are things we can do to help with saving the Curlew and making it easier for them to survive in difficult locations.

What Is A Curlew?

A Curlew is a European water bird that can be found in the UK. They are part of a group of birds known as waders because of how they prefer to wade in shallow water.

They can be found anywhere there is water in the UK but prefer the coast and can be spotted in many UK coastal towns. They are also found wading in mudflats and estuaries.

Why Is The Curlew In Danger?

The Curlew is listed as a ‘vulnerable species’ and is on the European red list meaning they are at high risk of extinction. Curlew numbers are dropping in the UK and there’s been a 20-30% reduction in curlew breeding numbers in the past 15 years.

The Curlew is also on the UK red list and is one of the most important conservations in the UK at the moment.

There are many reasons the curlew is facing extinction and sadly most of them are down to human involvement. Including loss and fragmentation of breeding habitat, increased nest and chick predation, afforestation, human disturbance and nest destruction due to agricultural activities. 

Many birds, not just curlew, are losing vital breeding and feeding grounds to human structures. As the UK population grows and expands, as do our residential areas. This means curlew are returning to the UK for food and mating grounds and discovering they are no longer there.

For many birds, every day is a struggle for survival. They have to find enough food to eat to maintain the proper nutrients and calories it takes for them to survive, day by day. They also need to be able to nest and find a safe place to mate, lay and incubate eggs and then they must keep their chicks safe and well-fed also.

This is almost impossible without the natural habitats they rely on. Birds are having to survive on less food, which means fewer nutrients, which means less energy to use throughout the day.

How Can I Help Save The Curlew And Other Endangered Birds?

Helping to save endangered birds is a lot easier than you think. All birds really need is access to food and water and a safe place to do so. You can make your garden into a safe area for birds to come and rest and eat to build up their strength so that they have the energy that they need for the day.

If you are going to leave food out for a bird then you need to make sure it is suitable. Seeds and nuts from a supermarket can sometimes have chemicals and preservatives that are harmful to birds. If you want to make sure that what you are feeding garden birds won’t hurt them, your safest option is to use a bird food specialist.

Here at Kenedy Wild Bird Food all of our bird food has been specially designed to not only be safe for birds to eat but to provide them with all the nutrients and proteins they need to make it through the day.

Kenedy Wild Bird Food has a range of bird food to suit every kind of bird including:

Mixed Birdseed

We sell a range of mixed birds seeds with every mix specially designed to either suit a particular bird or help with a particular part of the bird’s diet.

Mealworms For Birds

We sell both dried and live mealworms for birds. We also sell a specially designed mealworm bird feeder.

Peanuts For Birds

The peanuts we sell for birds are different from the ones you find in supermarkets. It’s important that you only feed birds food that has been tested so that it is not harmful to them. We have a variety of peanuts for birds including peanuts both with and without shells.

Plain Wild Bird Seeds

We get a variety of different seeds from a range of different plants and food mixes including maize, oats and raisins.

Suet For Birds

Suet is a great alternative to dry foods. Here at Kennedy Wild Bird Feed we have a variety of different suet products like suet pellets, fat balls and filled coconut shells.

Sunflower Seeds For Birds

Sunflower seeds are possibly the best thing you could feed to your garden birds. They are full of all the nutrients and good fats that birds need to stay healthy. We have sunflower hearts, sunflower heart chips and black sunflower seeds.

Sunflower Seeds for birds

In summer it can be harder for wildlife to source water. All wildlife needs water for drinking and also to stay cool especially when it’s hot in summer and they are burning more energy.

You can help local wildlife like birds, squirrels hedgehogs and more by making sure they have access to water. There are several ways you can provide water for these animals, but sometimes just placing a bowl of water out in your garden might not always be the safest option for some smaller creatures like birds.

Do Birds Need Water?

Birds need water to survive. They need to drink it to stay hydrated. Sometimes in the wild, birds are able to get moisture from eating juicy foods like fruit.

Fruit isn’t always readily available to birds, especially if they live in built-up and suburban areas. A lot of birds in built-up and suburban areas have very dry diets, especially if they mostly survive from food in birdfeeders that tend to be very dry.

Birds do have smaller sweat glands than a lot of wildlife so luckily they don’t lose too much water through perspiration. They do however look hydrated through respiration and excretion so will still need to drink plenty throughout the day.

Birds will also need water for bathing in. For flying animals, it is essential that they keep their feathers in a good condition. Birds need water so they can dampen their feather and this makes them easier to preen.

Preening is when the birds rearrange their feather and spread oil from the preen gland over the feather to help keep them waterproof and trap an insulating layer of air underneath to keep them warm

How Should I Provide Water For Birds?

Providing birds with water will attract more birds to your garden, however, you should be careful how you choose to supply it. Placing a bowl of water on the ground will attract birds, but It will also attract other creatures.

Feeding and drinking low on the ground can make birds an easy target for predators like cats who can easily pounce when a bird is preoccupied.

To keep your garden birds safe make sure the water is somewhere high up or better yet use a birdbath. A birdbath is a great way to provide birds with water that is safe and away from predators, whilst also being the right size for them to drink from or bathe in.

It can also help to have a large area of water like a pond or a pool in your garden, this way a bird can swoop down and collect water without having to stay near the ground long enough for a predator to attack.

What More Can I Do For Birds?

It’s not just water that birds need. Birds use up a lot of every throughout the day so need to be able to get food whenever they need it. By having a bird feeder in your garden you can provide a much-needed source of food for the birds. Having a bird feeder and a place for your birds to get water will not only really help the birds that do visit your garden but will also attract more birds.

What Should I Feed The Birds

Here at Kennedy Wild Bird Feed, we have a variety of healthy nutritious foods to suit any garden bird that may visit. Including

Mixed Birdseed

We sell a range of mixed birds seeds with every mix specially designed to either suit a particular bird or help with a particular part of the bird’s diet.

Mealworms For Birds

We sell both dried and live mealworms for birds. We also sell a specially designed mealworm bird feeder.

Peanuts For Birds

The peanuts we sell for birds are different from the ones you find in supermarkets. It’s important you only feed birds food that has been tested so that is it not harmful to them. We have a variety of peanuts for birds including peanuts both with and without shells.

Plain Wild Bird Seeds

We get a variety of different seeds from a range of different plants and food mixes including maize, oats and raisins.

Suet For Birds

Suet is a great alternative to dry foods. Here at Kennedy Wild Bird Feed we a have a variety of different suet products like suet pellets, fat balls and filled coconut shells.

Sunflower Seeds For Birds

Sunflower seeds are possibly the best thing you possibly feed to your garden birds. They are full of all the nutrients and good fats birds need to stay healthy. We have sunflower hearts, sunflower heart chips and black sunflower seeds.

Here at Kennedy Wild Bird Food, we love to see the different types of birds our customer’s spot in their gardens or local areas. Plus we get a lot of questions about bird identification, bird feeding, and customers sharing stories of birds they have seen with each other.

Combining all of this in one place we now have a dedicated way for you to record all the birds you have spotted, access identification guides, view birds others have spotted in your area, and a handy A-Z of common birds including feeding guides and other useful information.

Bird Spotter

Allow us to introduce you to Bird Spotter – our dedicated area for recording the birds you see and discovering what other species people have seen in your local area.

Using Bird Spotter is as easy and signing up only takes a minute.

The first time you go to enter a bird, you will be prompted to log in or sign up (see form below), simply create a username and set a password for instant access. For convenience, you can also use your Facebook account to log in.

bird spotter log in screen shot

Once you are signed up, click on the ‘ADD BIRD’ tab and then follow the prompts to add your sighting. You can add the location, species, and a photo of the bird you have seen, plus add any additional notes you may wish to remember.

bird spotter screen grab

Once you have finished your entry, simply click submit and your entry will go live on the site within a few minutes. You will then be able to see your sightings, plus others will be able to view your sightings.

Navigate through to the home page where you will find a map (ensure your location services are switched on in your browser or this feature won’t work) you will be able to view your birds on the map, plus others in your area. Use the tick boxes or the search function on the left-hand side to search for specific species in your area – who knows, you might even find someone else spotted your bird!

bird spot screen grab map

Identifying Birds

Spotted a bird but not too sure what it is?

Scroll through our handy A-Z of birds to help you find your bird. Each entry has a clear picture to enable you to quickly find the bird you are looking for.

bird a-z screen shot

When you have found the bird you are looking for, click on the image to be taken through to a guide on the species, including a bird feeding guide.

Enjoying Bird Spotter?

As you can see Bird Spotter is very easy to use and is a great way to record your findings and discover new species.

We are continually improving the website so if you have any suggestions on other features we could add or improvements you would like to see, please do get in touch!

So you have bought a nest box in a bid to lure more feathered friends into your garden but are now unsure exactly where you should place the box?

If so, youre in the right place – see below for our handy guide to situating your new nest box.

situating a nest box

Situating A Nest Box

How High?

Different species of birds like to nest at different levels, but most common garden birds will feel comfortable and safe at somewhere between two and four metres.

Shady Spots Only Please  

Nest boxes can become extremely hot when they’re situated in direct sunlight. Avoid south-facing exposures completely and aim to hang your box in a nice, shaded spot.

Out Of Reach

Cats and other predators aren’t beyond trying to invade a nest box if they can reach them. Ensure your box isn’t near any structures which could provide predators with easy access.

Provide Cover

Birds are much more likely to choose your nest box to rear their chicks if the box is protected a little. Nest boxes in trees, for example, offer a little more privacy and protection.

Quiet Please!

Place nest boxes in areas with low footfall where they are least likely to be disturbed by humans or pets. Some birds aren’t as shy as others, but a quiet spot is suitable for most birds.

Feed In Separate Areas

Birds generally won’t nest in the same areas they choose to feed. If you provide bird food in your garden, situate bird boxes in a different area.

Although many of us leave bird food in our gardens to attract birds there are many other ways to attract lots of birds to your garden.

Natural Bird Food

Although we are all accustomed to birds eating the bird food, we leave out for them, what we call bird food is only part of their diet. Bird food includes a wide variety of items birds consume in the ‘wild’.

This is mostly insects, seeds, fruits, and berries. Some species may have a favourite food item and be very adept at obtaining their favourite snack – for example, the song thrush is famous for its love of snails and the rather gruesome practice of smashing snails against rocks to extract the soft parts inside the shell.

Other birds aren’t fussy at all and will eat whatever food is most abundant. Some birds only eat plant matter such as seeds and berries, whilst others prefer something meatier and look for bigger bugs such as worms and beetles. Some birds, such as those in the corvid family (crows, magpies, rooks) are scavengers with a taste for more substantial meals. This is why they can often be observed eating animals such as hedgehogs or rabbits that have met an unfortunate end on the roads.

The point is the food we provide birds is just a small portion of their diet and nearly all birds prefer their natural diet. Therefore, if you aim to make your garden more diverse and full of things birds would eat in the wild, you are guaranteed to not only get more birds but a wider range of species too.

The best way to do this is by increasing the variety of plants, trees and shrubs in your garden. Try to feature British native species and species that are known for being ‘wildlife friendly’ in your bird friendly garden design.

By increasing the number and variety of plants in your garden, you will provide habitat and food for a wide range of insects, which in turn will attract more birds. Bugs mean birds!

Some plants and trees will attract birds directly. For example, the teasel (Dipsacus Fullonum) is not only an excellent plant for pollinators such as bees, but the seed heads are extremely attractive to birds. Plant teasels in your garden and you are guaranteed visits from Goldfinch who have just the right size beak to extract the tiny seeds.

Trees also hold a lot of value for birds. Tress not only provide cover and a place to nest, but they can also be food.

If you want to plant a tree in your garden the most beneficial species you can plant for birds are holly, rowan, or crab apple. All three of these trees produce fruits or berries that birds love to eat. They also attract pollinators and insects’ birds prefer to feed to their young. Plus, they look pretty so you benefit too!

Nesting & Roosting

All birds need a safe place to nest and roost. You can create more spaces in your garden for this by increasing the number of trees and shrubs you have. You may already notice that seemingly basic plants such as conifers, although they provide little in the way of food for birds or insects, are highly valued by birds for the thick cover they provide.

If your garden is too small to accommodate more trees and shrubs, many species of bird will adopt nest boxes for nesting. Just ensure the nest boxes are situated high enough so that predators are unable to reach them, aren’t in direct sunlight, and are kept in good clean order.

Other Ways To Attract Birds

Aside from creating a space for birds to roost, nest or eat, you could try providing water. Water is important for all wildlife from birds to insects.

Water is vital for birds, especially in the summer when water may be scarce, and birds struggle to stay hydrated. Not only do birds need water to drink, but they also need to bathe on a regular basis to keep their feathers free from dust and pests.

Water can be provided in a variety of ways – from an old sink to an old whisky barrel but the best way to provide water for all types of garden visitors is in a shallow container. Not only is this safer (any individuals falling into the water will be able to get back out) but birds will find it much easier to bathe and drink in water they can stand up in.

Another way to make your garden a haven for birds is to try not to let cats wander too much. This is easier said than done but birds will be much warier visiting a garden where cats are always present.

Of course, in addition to all this advice, you can continue to provide purchased bird food to help attract more birds to your garden.

Visit our online bird feed shop for a wide range of bird food, available with free next day delivery.